Back Float

Back Float  #

Introduction  #

The Back Float skill develops Stationary Surface CompetencyStationary Surface CompetencyStationary Surface Competency is the knowledge, skill, and experience necessary to remain at one location on the surface of the water for sustained periods of time for both strategic and energy-conservation purposes. Understanding the relationship between breathing and buoyancy and utilizing that relationship to affect buoyancy and body position are core components of being able to stay at the surface for extended periods of time. Physical abilities associated with this competency include being able to float in more than one position and being able to generate upward (vertical) propulsion with the arms and legs to keep the head above the surface. Cognitive abilities include understanding whether a floating skill or a treading skill is best suited for a given situation and set of conditions, and determining which specific floating or treading technique may be the most effective for the task at hand. . Floating is a foundational aquatic motor skillMotor skillA learned ability which involves coordinated movement and actions of the body and limbs. Gross motor skills involve the use of the arms, legs, and other large body parts. Fine motor skills involve the use of smaller body parts such as the wrists, hands, fingers, ankles, feet, and toes. requiring buoyancyBuoyancyThe ability or tendency to float on, or to rise to, the surface of the water. control and body control. Buoyancy control, which includes the ability to stay near the surface, is the foundation of many water skills and is essential for being in a position to be able to continuously breathe. Body control provides the ability to relax and conserve energy in an aquatic environment. Additionally, confidence and comfort gained with floating will lead to an easier experience learning of other skills on their back, such as back swims or orientation skills.

Description  #

The Back Float skill is defined by the following body posturePostureThe particular way the body is held while doing an activity. Mobility specialists define posture as the way you position your body or arrange your limbs, such as “to stand up straight with your shoulders back and your chin up.” , arm formsFormThe visible shape or configuration of something. Mobility specialists define form as an arrangement of the elements in a composition; the way something (or someone) is shaped or arranged. , leg forms, breathing, and timing characteristics and features.

Back Float Description  #

Body

  1. Body positioned on backBack / On backA supineSupineSituated on the back, or dorsal, surface of the body with the face and chest upward.
    body position such that the face and chest are oriented up. “On back” means to have a supine body position on or near the surface of the water.
  2. Chest and hips at surface
  3. Body remains still
  4. Head, neck, and spine in line
  5. Face above surface with ears under surface

Arms

  1. Arms remain still at or near surface
  2. Arms extendedExtendFor limbs – to fully straighten and reach towards or away from something. For joints – to straighten, not flex. out near shoulder level or just overhead

Legs

  1. Legs remain still at or near surface
  2. Legs extended with some separation

Breathing

  1. Breathing controlledControlled breathingBreathing in a consistent and repeating manner that does not interfere with performing a skill. or breath held

Assessment  #

Scoring  #

The following scoring rubricScoring rubricA guide that includes rating scales and descriptions of one or more criteria used to evaluate the performance of a skill. lists the gradients of key requirements and deficiencies that provide an overall description of different competence levels. A single score is assigned based on the instructor’s judgment of the student’s performance.

Back Float Scoring Rubric  #

1

Exhibits any of the following:

  • Floats on back for less than 3 seconds
  • Has face below the surface

2

Performs all of the following:

  • Floats on back for at least 3 seconds
  • Keeps face above the surface

Exhibits any of the following:

  • Has chest or hips below surface
  • Does not extend arms and legs
  • Has arms or legs sagging below the surface
  • Moves limbs or head continuously

3

Performs all of the following:

  • Floats on back for at least 5 seconds
  • Keeps chest and hips at the surface
  • Keeps face above the surface
  • Keeps arms and legs at or near the surface
  • Keeps arms straight
  • Keeps legs straight

Exhibits any of the following:

  • Does not keep head, neck, and spine in line
  • Has ears above the surface
  • Has some body or limb movement
  • Has arms fully overhead or near sides
  • Has legs together
  • Breathing disrupts float posture

4

Performs all of the following:

  • Floats on back for 10 seconds
  • Keeps chest and hips at the surface
  • Keeps head, neck, and spine in line
  • Keeps face above surface with ears under the surface
  • Keeps body and limbs still
  • Keeps arms and legs at or near the surface
  • Extends arms out near shoulder level or just overhead
  • Extends legs with some separation
  • Holds breath or has controlled breathing